Posts Tagged With Type Design

David Carson for Nike

This piece was designed by David Carson for Nike. This piece of work was created as an advertisement for Nike’s Air Challenge. This design piece was significant in David Carson’s career because, after years of only taking part in editorial work, Nike was one of the first companies to contact him and ask him to…

David Carson for Beach Culture Magazine

This piece by David Carson in collaboration with Beach Culture magazine in 1990. This certain piece is significant to Carson’s career for multiple reasons. During his time working for Beach Culture, Carson began to gain more attention from the public. Even though Beach Culture only stayed around long enough to publish six issues, this is…

David Carson

David Carson joined the graphic design scene relatively late in life. Though born on September 8, 1955, Carson didn’t make a wave in the design world until the 1990s.  Carson went on to study sociology at San Diego State University. There, he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree and eventually took up a teaching…

Depero’s Project 1

One of Depero’s projects that first stood out to me was I balli plastici. This is a set design that was created in 1921. In 1917, Depero  began to conceive of a Futurist ballet in which machine-like puppets would replace human actors and dancers.  He felt that this would emphasize the Futurist ideals of technology…

North by Northwest

North by Northwest is a thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock about an advertising executive in New York City who is mistaken to be a government agent and has to outrun foreign spies. However, the star of this movie was the famous introduction, designed by Saul Bass in 1959. This experimental sequence is often cited as…

The Introduction of “The Island of Dr. Moreau”

  For the opening sequence of the film “The Island of Dr. Moreau” Richard Stanley and John Frankenheimer set out to create an environment that clearly communicates the psychological horror aspect of the film. The key notion is that what the viewer is about to watch is full of mystery, dread, and unsettling concepts. This…

Michael Rock: It Is What It Is

It Is What It Is, is a collective of images and work from the 2×4 studio. The images were compiled by of 2×4’s founding partners, Michael Rock. This book is very important in that it directly reflects the ideology and methodology that Rock showcases in his work and what the 2×4 studio aligns with as…

A. M. Cassandre – Peignot

Cassandre was most well known as a poster artist, but he delved into many different areas of art, including the creation of typefaces. Many of his typefaces were widely used and impactful, with one of the more interesting types being Peignot, which he created in 1937. The type was commissioned by Deberny & Peignot. The…

Linn Boyd Benton’s Self Spacing Type

During the 1880s, the type industry began to face a frustrating design problem. Because type supplies – sizes, widths, base alignment and metal alloy – were uncommon, most printing establishments had no choice but to continue a business relationship with a single type foundry rather than branching out into others. The lack of advanced printing…

Linn Boyd Benton’s Century Typeface

Century is a family of serif typefaces meant for use in body text. Linn Boyd Benton with American Type Founders (ATF) designed this font in 1894, for Theodore Low De Vinne to be used in The Century Magazine. Following his many machine-produced typography inventions, this typeface was the only one created by Benton during his…

Hermann Zapf Optima 1958

Previously, type designers were unsuccessful in their attempt to create a sans-serif type that “could be considered both beautiful and utilitarian” (Lawson, 324). “For the better part of a century, sans-serif types tended to be unimaginative renditions of roman letter forms, although it was discovered that their monotone characteristics did allow for variations of weight…