Posts Tagged With title sequence

Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End (2016)

Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End begins its game with an opening sequence that has various design elements that are telling of the themes and ideas that will be present throughout. The sequence’s visuals, typography, and use of lighting all set the stage for what kind of game Uncharted 4 is. The entire title occurs within…

“The Lego Movie” Title Sequence

“The Lego Movie” never fails to live up to its name as all aspects of the film are done entirely in lego animation, including the title sequence. Interestingly, the movie actually has no opening title sequence, and instead never reveals the title or any credits until the very end of the film. A deep look…

Spectre

The James Bond series, originating in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming, is arguably one of the most iconic and well-known examples of opening title sequence design. From the original 1962 adaptation of Fleming’s work, Dr. No, a stunning collection of artful and immensely-detailed opening credits followed; resulting from this, certain imagery and even film scores…

Catch Me if You Can

Opening title sequences are one of the most important parts of a movie or television show because it hooks the watcher in and makes sure you continue to watch. If a television show or movie doesn’t have an entertaining or nice to look at title sequence not many individuals are going to want to keep…

The Borgias

Season one of Showtime’s The Borgias (2011) is a show the depicts the decadent lies and scandals of the Borgia family, outsiders from Spain who attempt to take over Renaissance-era Italy through treachery, lies, and manipulation. The Borgias is packed full of themes such as lust, greed, and murder. Through the art of imagery, movement, and…

Karin Fong: Film Titling & Film Titling as Experience

While watching the two assigned videos for Karin Fong, I was automatically captivated by her passion and enthusiasm towards animating title sequences. The creation and impact of title sequences is something that people don’t really give enough credit to–they’re often overlooked if not skipped over by a vast majority of audiences, Netflix’s recent “SKIP INTRO”…

Thank You for Smoking

“Thank You for Smoking” boasts a title sequence that correlates directly with the plot and feel of this satirical comedy. This sequence was crafted by the production studio Smith & Lee Design, a firm that earned awards for introducing both “Juno” and “Up in the Air.” This introduction is nothing like those two, though, and…