Posts Tagged With font

Robert Slimbach Work (2): Minion Typeface

The font Minion was first released in 1990. The family contains sixty-five different styles, including 4 weights (plus italics), in 2 widths and 4 optical sizes, as well as a standalone Black version. In designing this Serif Font family, Robert Slimbach took inspiration from fonts of the late Renaissance, as he wanted to create something…

Who’s Who in Graphic Design: Robert Slimbach!

American Type designer Robert Slimbach was born in Evanston, Illinois, and grew up in the area of Southern California. Although he is now a known designer, he surprisingly attended University of California Los Angeles on an athletic scholarship for gymnastics. He later discovered the love he had for design and typography, and worked to run…

Gill San Seriff

Gill Sans is a typeface developed by Eric Gill in 1928. The font takes inspiration from the typeface Johnston Sans which most notably used by the London Underground. Gill was an apprentice to and helped designed the typeface with Edward Johnston. Originally a side project by Gill as he wanted to make Johnston Sans appear…

Kabel Font – Rudolf Koch

Rudolf Koch’s font, Kabel, was released in 1927 as a celebration of the newly created “trans-atlantic cable” (Kabel). While a majority of Koch’s work has undertones of German expressionism due to his attraction toward nationalism, Kabel is simple, clean, and doesn’t leave much to the imagination. As a result, this best falls under German Modernism…

Hermann Zapf Virtuosa 1952; 2009

“Until the nineteenth century, books remained the major product of the printer. By the beginning of industrialization, the traditions of roman, italic, and black-letter types had been well established” (Lawson, 363). However; script types did not readily join their serif and sans serif counterparts in the new century. At the time, very few script types…

Hermann Zapf Optima 1958

Previously, type designers were unsuccessful in their attempt to create a sans-serif type that “could be considered both beautiful and utilitarian” (Lawson, 324). “For the better part of a century, sans-serif types tended to be unimaginative renditions of roman letter forms, although it was discovered that their monotone characteristics did allow for variations of weight…

Helvetica (the movie)

The eye of a designer sees much more than most other people. Walking around the streets of New York City, a businessman might not look around and see all of the typefaces and signage that surrounds him. He probably wouldn’t notice that a majority of these posters, advertisements, and signs feature the font Helvetica. Helvetica…