Posts Tagged With Aubrey Beardsley

Part II: Aubrey Beardsley: The Climax

The project that I chose to do by Aubrey Beardsley is “The Climax”. The Climax is an 1893 pen and ink illustration. Beardsley’s style was influenced by Japanese woodcuts, but instead of doing it on wood he did it on paper making it slightly different.  This depicts a scene from Oscar Wilde’s play Salome, in…

Aubrey Beardsley

The artist I have chosen to do for Who’s Who in Graphic Design is Aubrey Beardsley. Aubrey Beardsley was the son of Vincent Beardsley and Ellen Agnus. He was born on August 21st in 1872 in Brighton, England. His family was middle and upper class origins although his dad lost all of his fortunes when…

William H. Bradley

Penfield, Edward, and Pollard, Percival. Posters in miniature. New York: R.H. Russell (1896), pg 240.   The American designer William H. Bradley is one of the most influential designers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Regarded as the “American Aubrey Beardsley,” Bradley left behind a legacy of incorporating many  styles into design due…

The Twins by William Bradley

Mellby, Julie. “The Twins.” Princeton University, The Trustees of Princeton University, 3 Oct. 2011.   The name William H. Bradley is now synonymous with American Art Nouveau. It was through his work on advertizing posters for the magazine The Chap Book that Bradley refined his style, and made his name known. In order to advertise…

Fringalla by William Bradley

Will Bradley: His Graphic Art: a Collection of His Posters, Illustrations, Typographic Designs & Decorations. Dover Publications, 1974. p.17.   William H. Bradley was one of the first American designers to employ the principles and style of Art Nouveau in his work (Flinchum). Though many of his earliest works included poster and magazine cover design,…

The Yellow Book

The Yellow Book was a leading periodical in the 1890s for its distinctive and distinguished format, as it combined the avant-garde with the traditional in its visual and verbal contents and appeal to the popular readership interested in books as beautiful objects.  Its concept was first formulated by Aubrey Beardsley and his friend Henry Harland. …

Salomé

Salomé is a tragedy by Oscar Wilde, published first in France in 1891 and in English in 1894  The play tells one act of the biblical story of Salomé, the stepdaughter of Herod, who requested the head of John the Baptist, as a reward of doing the “Dance of the seven veils.” Beardsley accepted the challenge…