Posts Tagged With Art Nouveau

Who’s Who in Design: Henry Van De Velde

As the son of a chemist in the city of Antwerp, Belgium, Henry Clemens Van de Velde was one of eight children.  After passing the entrance exams, and against his parents wishes whom wanted him to follow in their footsteps with a middle-class career, he enrolled in the Academy of Fine Arts.  It was here…

Van de Velde: Bloemenwerf House

The Bloemenwerf house is in Uccle, a suburb of Brussels, Belgium. This beautiful home was designed by Henry Van de Velde as his first major piece, and venture into full architecture, although never trained in the field. After being strongly influenced by the British Arts and Crafts Movement, “art for the people, by the people”,…

Aubrey Beardsley

The artist I have chosen to do for Who’s Who in Graphic Design is Aubrey Beardsley. Aubrey Beardsley was the son of Vincent Beardsley and Ellen Agnus. He was born on August 21st in 1872 in Brighton, England. His family was middle and upper class origins although his dad lost all of his fortunes when…

William H. Bradley

Penfield, Edward, and Pollard, Percival. Posters in miniature. New York: R.H. Russell (1896), pg 240.   The American designer William H. Bradley is one of the most influential designers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Regarded as the “American Aubrey Beardsley,” Bradley left behind a legacy of incorporating many  styles into design due…

The Twins by William Bradley

Mellby, Julie. “The Twins.” Princeton University, The Trustees of Princeton University, 3 Oct. 2011.   The name William H. Bradley is now synonymous with American Art Nouveau. It was through his work on advertizing posters for the magazine The Chap Book that Bradley refined his style, and made his name known. In order to advertise…

Fringalla by William Bradley

Will Bradley: His Graphic Art: a Collection of His Posters, Illustrations, Typographic Designs & Decorations. Dover Publications, 1974. p.17.   William H. Bradley was one of the first American designers to employ the principles and style of Art Nouveau in his work (Flinchum). Though many of his earliest works included poster and magazine cover design,…

Otto Eckmann

  Otto Eckmann Fox Tile 1899   Before this image, I had a bit of difficulty looking for the similarities between Art Nouveau and Japanese tapestries, but, however, with this tile created for houses, I can see the inspiration far more clearly. This piece makes me think that the art nouveau period was a total…

Otto Eckmann

Otto Eckmann Five Swans Tapestry 1897   In this piece, I was struck by the clear intersection of Medieval and Japanese aesthetic, combined intentionally by Eckmann. In Germany specifically, Jugendstil was predominantly formed from Japanese folk art/calligraphic forms and Medieval European art/lettering. Design principles are really being explored in this particular tapestry, just proving how sophisticated…

Otto Eckmann

  Otto Eckmann The Weekly magazine Jugend No.14 1896   Otto Eckmann’s work with the Jugend magazine is what brought him the majority of his fame, so, naturally, one of his personally designed magazine covers would be important to explain. This was one of the earliest editions of the magazine that reeled in a popular…

Ed Benguiat: ITC Benguiat Stranger Things

Ed Benguiat’s most famous project by far is his self-titled font, “ITC Benguiat.” The designer desired to create a font that was “pretty and legible.” This classic decorative serif was published in the late 1970s through the International Typeface Corporation (ITC), which housed the majority of Benguiat’s fonts. He had no intention to title the…

The Yellow Book

The Yellow Book was a leading periodical in the 1890s for its distinctive and distinguished format, as it combined the avant-garde with the traditional in its visual and verbal contents and appeal to the popular readership interested in books as beautiful objects.  Its concept was first formulated by Aubrey Beardsley and his friend Henry Harland. …