Magic, Nonsense, and Macramé

When one thinks of a traditional graphic designer, one’s mind immediately goes to 2D print, branding, logos, etc. However, Stephen Doyle not only creates inspiring 2D projects, but also loves to bring his projects to life into our 3D world. This project, Stephen Doyle’s interlaced chairs, creating a venn-diagram from bird’s eye view, is a classic example of this (see picture below.) 

Created for Fast Company magazine, who wanted a piece that showed their own design ideas (the company choose to mix up their seating plan in order to create a “cross-fertilization and hybridization of ideas”)(3). These chairs represent Doyle and his company’s brainstorming processes, as they are the “three principles [they] use when designing to try to make work engaging or enchanted.” The chairs are their own color, one blue, one yellow, and one red. However, when they come together at the top, their colors collide, creating a perfect white triangle in the middle. The blue represents magic. Magic is what causes lift off, defying gravity and “participates in the ether of fun.”(2) The yellow represents macramé. This is where you use your hands in order to generate an idea. He doesn’t know where his hands will take him, but he instinctively just knows to follow his fingers and let them be his guide. Lastly, the red is for nonsense. This is what gives the piece life, interest, and adds to the levity of magic. In his own words,  “a touch of magic, so can defy gravity; a touch of nonsense, so can defy logic; and a touch of macramé, so can transcend expectations.” (4)

 

Bibliography:

  1. Dawood, S. (2018, May 02). Stephen Doyle: “I like to make things that disobey logic and reason”. Retrieved April 7, 2019, from https://www.designweek.co.uk/issues
  2. Design Indaba. (2019, April 05). Stephen Doyle: Magic, nonsense and macramé. Retrieved April 7, 2019, from https://vimeo.com/106933252
  3. Petite, Z. (2017, March 26). “Think With Your Hands.” The Words and Work of Stephen Doyle. Retrieved April 7, 2019, from https://www.printmag.com/featured/words-and-work-of-stephen-doyle/
  4. Type@Cooper. (2019, April 07). Typographics: Off the Page and into the World with Stephen Doyle. Retrieved April 7, 2019, from https://vimeo.com/189439026