Peter Bil’ak – Fontstand

in 2015 Bil’ak and Andrej Krátky started a font rental website, Fontstand.com. Fontstand.com is described as music streaming for fonts. Fontstand is an app for mac that allows users to rent typefaces from designers and foundries of high caliber. Instead of having to buy a complete font family, it allows users to rent specific fonts from the family for the limited time it is needed. The app also allows users to share fonts with friends, making fonts easily sharable and accessible to everyone. This creates a platform for fonts that has never even been thought of, allowing users to share fonts with others, giving fonts exposure never experienced before. When Fontstand was started, they did not have a specific target but just believed the timing was right. They were clearly right, now having more than 33,000 registered users. Fontstand has become immensely useful for graphic design students, as one would imagine. Some classes have even creating assignments that use the application. This application uses the innovation of streaming music for fonts, making fonts much more accessible for everyone. This project was important for the design world as it made the community much more inclusive and expanded the market by giving  users the opportunity to rent or buy the specific fonts they want, instead of the whole font family. This application exemplifies Bil’ak’s unique contributions to the design world as it is not him directly creating fonts, however, it is him creating a larger platform for all fonts.

(Photo form https://www.typotheque.com/articles/the_history_of_history)

References

http://www.eyemagazine.com/feature/article/generation-font-rent

https://eyeondesign.aiga.org/fontstand-is-like-affordable-music-streaming-for-fonts-only-the-designers-actually-get-paid/

Discussion — One Response

  • Rachael Paine 05/03/2019 on 11:49 AM

    I really enjoyed all three parts of your post. I hadn’t heard of Peter Bi’lak before and this work is all very interesting. I just downloaded Fontstand on my computer. This is an interesting example of how designers can work in participatory methods.

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